Hand of God

by

It is popular to talk of the debate (or even “battle”) between science and religion. I am not sure they are really that much at odds. In some ways they are both looking for truth, or at least some description of our reality. Is the belief in a “creator” really much worse than the belief (by some) of superstrings and dark matter (or any other currently unprovable theory)?

Rather than attempt to fight an unwinnable battle, I want to consider the ways in which what science knows is similar to what religion preaches.

Creation

The so-called Big Bang sounds much like a moment of creation to me. Even the sequence sounds like a detailed version of the allegorical Biblical description (from light, to matter, to planets, to life). Even if you do not want to consider God, you still might like to know what the Universe expanded into (and if it has an end, what is beyond it), and why that pinpoint of matter or energy existed in the first place.

The Hand of God

Scientists ascribe some unexplained phenomenon to things such as “dark matter” and “dark energy”. The religiously inclined could see the “dark” stuff described here the invisible hand of God keeping our world running (“dark” referencing unseen and not the work of the dark master – the Devil).

Heaven

Black holes are a place where spacetime becomes so distorted that time has no meaning. Upon entering a black hole future, past, and present would become one (at least compared to outside the black hole). Such a place sounds much like the eternity of the afterlife described by many religions.

Really?

Am I really trying to prove the existence of God? Of course not. Many minds smarter than mine have fought that hill; this is more a light (very light) philosophical discussion for a Sunday (perhaps showing the bias of my Christian heritage) afternoon. I am sure that sharper intellects could build on (or tear down) these musings.

I wonder if religion and creation stories have something to do with the development of consciousness. Could the Adam and Eve story derive from folk history of that first moment of conscious (direct awareness of self and others) of early humans?

PS
When I considered this post, it seemed so much smarter than it does as I read the final version.

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Hand of God”

  1. Will S. Says:

    “Could the Adam and Eve story derive from folk history of that first moment of conscious (direct awareness of self and others) of early humans?”

    If one believes it is real, then no, we can’t buy that.

    Rather, as a Christian, I am happy to learn that other, non-Jewish cultures have flood accounts, like the Sumerians; though not needed for the faithful, that is corroboration of what Genesis tells us. If an event is real, then we should expect that the knowledge of that will be passed on and passed down, and transmitted through different cultures, even if the details change, as in the old ‘telephone’ game…
    [DU: I was not attempting to undermine or disprove Christian belief. It was more about musings that seemed cleverer while musing than when actually written. Your telephone game analogy makes sense.

    Another of my cleverer-while-musing-not-as-clever-when-written thoughts regard the mythology of dragons. Dragons (at least as depicted in modern tales) seem somewhat like the conception of dinosaurs. Does some ancestral memory drive these tales, or did made up tales just take the conception of dinosaurs as their base?
    {Of course, later investigation posits that dinosaurs may have been more bird like and less of the spiky scaly description of earlier depiction, thus mocking my “ancestral memory” suggestion.}]

  2. Will S. Says:

    Ah, okay.

    Yes, re: dragons, one can also wonder about the Loch Ness monster, leviathan, and the like; perhaps they are driven by ancestral prehistoric memories of dinosaurs – if indeed, dinosaurs did coexist with humans, which, if one holds to creation rather than evolution and the billions-years-old earth materialist account, seems likely.

    I also think the fact that unicorns figure in European mythology as well as being mentioned in the Bible, corroborates their existence in times past, too.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: